My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat

And a tutorial on how I use the back fabric of a quilt to make the binding

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

This is the first hand-quilting work I have made, some 10 years ago. I attended a course where we made a sandwich, mark the top and played with a tiny needle.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.comMy First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.comMy First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.comMy First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.comMy First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Last week, I decided to make an ironing mat with it, instead of just keeping it folded somewhere. While stitching, I took pictures and made a tutorial that you can find below. There are pdf copies on my web site, in French and in English.

In the tutorial, you will see my new method of making corners. I am still wondering how to call them. I find they give the quilt a middle age look. Don’t you agree?

France

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How I Use the Back Fabric of a Quilt to Make the Binding – Tutorial

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Trace a line all around the perimeter of your quilt to mark the edges; this will coincide with the finished edges. I use a pencil.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Following your drawn lines, cut the top fabric and the batting. Make sure you do not cut the back fabric.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Trace a line on the back fabric at a distance of 1.5 cm / 1/2” from the edges of your top fabric. You can make the line at 2 cm / 3/4” or 2.5 cm / 1” from the edges if you want larger borders. Cut the back fabric along the line.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Fold the binding fabric twice. Start sewing it. I prefer to sew it by hand, but you can use a sewing machine. If you sew by hand, make sure you do not go through the back fabric. Fold the corner fabric.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Fold the tip of the corner fabric.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Continue sewing until you reach the corner fabric.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Prepare the fabric on the other side of the corner and pin into place. Insert your needle through the top fabric and the batting and bring it out at the other side of the corner.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Make all the corners in the same manner. They don’t have to be perfect.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

Continue sewing until you have stitched the whole perimeter.

My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat - And a tutorial on how I used the back fabric to make the binding - francenadeau.com

14 thoughts on “My First Hand-Quilting Project Turned into an Ironing Mat

  1. What if you treated it with scotch guard to prevent it from staining, would that work, or is scotch guard heat sensitive?

    • Well, I have no idea as I never used that product. I’m confident, though, that I’ll be able to keep it free from stains. I can always wash it in the washing machine. Thank you for visiting and for taking the time to make the suggestion!

  2. I think it’s a wonderful way to look at the hand quilting as you iron. Just keep the spray starch away from it.

  3. I was so relieved to read the last comment’s reply, France, as I too worried that your beautiful hand-quilted piece would get stains and goo on it. It’s much too nice to get ruined. Bravo! Your first hand-quilted piece is quite a masterpiece!

  4. France, your hand quilting is so perfect and it amazes me how wonderfully you did this right from your first try! This is a lovely piece. As is that beautiful house block that you showed in your first photo!

  5. Hi France, isn’t it a pity to use such a beautiful piece of handwork into an ironing mat? It will get the stains and just get soiled ((
    Your corners do look very nice! I have a technical question: after hand quilting, does the backing fabric lie flat or does it ripple? I made a self-bound mini quilt recently, it was actually a piece of FMQ practice, machine quilted quite heavily, and the edge of backing which i used for binding was really too lose compared to how the quilt itself shrunk, so I had to iron it very heavily (too much). Did you encounter this problem or is it OK with hand quilting?

    • Hi, Lena! Don’t worry, it will not get stained. I will use it only when I need to iron little pieces, as when I make quilt blocks and small little sewing projects. I don’t use glue, starch or anything chemical.
      When I do hand quilting, I use a hand-quilting loop. (One can also use a sturdy embroidery loop, sturdy enough for two layers of fabrics plus batting). With the loop, which keeps the fabrics tight, no ripples are produced when I work on it. Of course, when I washed the mat in my washing machine, it came out with wrinkles and I had to iron it. Cotton can be bothersome in that way…
      I never did heavy FMQ and never had to deal with such a piece. Therefore, I cannot say if the difference between the heavy quilting and the apparent “looseness” of the binding may cause such difference in your wrinkled zones. But a question comes to my mind… Was your binding tight enough? You may have noticed that I only used 1/2″ of the back fabric to make a 1/4″ binding. I folded it twice by 1/4″ and pulled it to sits very tightly against the edge of the quilt. There’s absolutely no space between the unfinished edge and the binding. And my hand stitches are always tight. This binding fabric cannot move.
      I wish to add that I always wash new fabrics. I never use fabric that has not been washed at least once. On top of that, after I washed the new fabric, I put it in the drying machine. After that, I know that all the threads of this fabric have been pulled and bent in any possible ways. They are now at their “natural place”.
      I thank you for visiting and taking the time to write to me. Have a good day!

      • Thank you for the detailed answer. You may right in that my binding was wider, so it had to much looseness in it. I’ll take it into account next time I decide to use this binding method. I took a couple of pictures of that mini quilt today, maybe I’ll publish them on the blog))

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